Brain’s ability to repair itself after stroke or injury

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The adult brain appears to have a surprisingly strong built-in capacity for change, a study by Vanderbilt University researchers suggests, creating the possibility for innovative treatments for brain disorders. The seemingly limited ability of the adult brain to recover from stroke or accidental injury has been a major stumbling block in treating […]

Continue Reading

Sensory Experience Alters The Development Of Brain Areas That Control Movement.

WASHINGTON, D.C. December 3 — New animal research shows that sensory deprivation not only influences the sensory brain areas, but surprisingly also stifles the development and organization of areas involved in the control of voluntary movement. And the effects are particularly drastic in early life. “The research suggests that sensory feedback to the brain’s motor […]

Continue Reading

Adult Brains Turn Back Developmental Clock To Repair Damage

A new study by UCLA neuroscientists shows for the first time that a unique pattern of cellular activity found in early brain development also triggers repairs to damaged adult brains. The findings, appearing in the July 15 edition of the peer-reviewed Journal of Neuroscience, hold implications for treating brain damage caused by stroke and other […]

Continue Reading

Harness Brain Plasticity to Treat Neurological Damage

Harnessing the brain’s plasticity key to treating neurological damage By Jennifer O’Brien on February 15, 2007 Michael Merzenich. Photo by Fiona McDougall —– SAN FRANCISCO – With an aging population susceptible to stroke, Parkinson’s disease and other neurological conditions, and military personnel returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with serious limb injuries, the need for strategies […]

Continue Reading

Vision and Brain Injury

Post-Trauma Vision Syndrome: Part I By William V. Padula, OD and Stephanie Argyris, OD A person who has suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) or cerebral vascular accident (CVA) may often experience difficulties with balance, spatial orientation, coordination, cognitive function, and speech. In most cases, a referral for visual consultation only occurs if there’s an […]

Continue Reading

Psychological trauma may leave visible trace in a child’s brain

A new study published in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology found that children with sympts aoms of post-traumatic stress had poor function of the hippocampus, a part of the brain that storend retrieves memories. This is the first study to use functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, to look at the function of the hippocampus […]

Continue Reading

Mommy Brain — It just gets BETTER.

The Real ‘Mommy Brain’: New Mothers Grew Bigger Brains Within Months of Giving Birth Warmer feelings toward babies linked to bigger mid-brains WASHINGTON — Motherhood may actually cause the brain to grow, not turn it into mush, as some have claimed. Exploratory research published by the American Psychological Association found that the brains of new […]

Continue Reading

Babies Sleep More Safely With Parents

  According to Dr. Jay Gordon, babies sleeping on a safe surface with sober, nonsmoking parents respond to their parents, and the parents respond to them. The chance of SIDS occurring in this situation are close to zero. Babies in a crib or in a room away from their parents, on the other hand, will […]

Continue Reading
Developmental Science

Prolonged Institutional rearing associated with large Amygdala and difficulties in emotional regulation

You have free access to this content Prolonged institutional rearing is associated with atypically large amygdala volume and difficulties in emotion regulation Nim Tottenham1, Todd A. Hare2, Brian T. Quinn3, Thomas W. McCarry1, Marcella Nurse1, Tara Gilhooly1, Alexander Millner1, Adriana Galvan4, Matthew C. Davidson5, Inge-Marie Eigsti6, Kathleen M. Thomas7, Peter J. Freed8, Elizabeth S. Booma1, […]

Continue Reading

Parenting May Hinder Brain Development

Modern parenting may hinder brain development, research suggests Date: January 7, 2013 Source: University of Notre Dame Summary: Social practices and cultural beliefs of modern life are preventing healthy brain and emotional development in children, according to an interdisciplinary body of research. Social practices and cultural beliefs of modern life are preventing healthy brain and […]

Continue Reading